Georgia Civil War Plantation!

Georgia Civil War Plantation!
Georgia Civil War Plantation!

Most of the pre Civil War southern plantations are gone now, destroyed in the Civil War or lost to fires, vandals and old age. However, one of the best plantations did survive and is now for sale. Shoulderbone Plantation in Georgia is the epitome of the working plantation of the Old South. Having escaped destruction during General Sherman’s March to the Sea, one has to wonder if the General didn’t also appreciate its exquisiteness and order his soldiers to pass it by unharmed.

Shoulderbone Plantation is part of the original King George's Land Grant of 1796 and is listed on the National Register and the Georgia Historic Trust. Historically owned by the same family, this is the first time the plantation has been for sale. It has been lovingly maintained and restored over the years and furnishings are original period.

History buffs the world over cannot help but be enchanted with the pristine conservation of this 628-acre farm and gleaming white home with its regal tall white columns. Every detail down to the original period furnishings added to from the surrounding area has been carefully placed and painstakingly maintained. Like stepping back into the past, the manicured land and elegant home create a strong connection with its place in history.

Currently the plantation offers traditional quail hunting for overnight or day hunting excursions. The farm manager maintains a perfect quail habitat and stock as well as hunting dogs available for hunting excursions. Parties of hunters can start their day with a hearty breakfast, then stay overnight in the main house or in the log cabin and enjoy wine, spirits and a four course meal served by the plantation’s chef. The venue is also available for weddings and other events.

Ponds, outbuildings, fenced and cross-fenced pastures lend itself to cattle or horse raising. It can be a single family home, a B&B or an event center for weddings and parties.

Living history available for sale for the first time, priced at $5.75 million.

More info: farmandranchsir.com