Sultan

Sultan

Some things that are remembered deserve to be forgotten. Others that are forgotten should be remembered. Some stories can become legend, while others are left to be nothing more than a whisper on the edge of our minds. Some stories need to be remembered just because it would be great to know what really happened. Such is the case with the Gardette-LaPrete Mansion, also known as the Sultan Massacre House.

The backdrop for this macabre tale is the steamy and sultry city of New Orleans. Few towns’ histories are interwoven with more supernatural happenings than the Big Easy. Hoodoo, Voodoo, Spiritualism and more ghosts than residents make the town and the 10,000 square foot murder mansion an even scarier tale to hear!

The nine bedroom, eight bath home in the French Quarter was constructed in 1836 for a wealthy dentist who then sold it to a rich plantation owner. After the family fortune was destroyed by the Civil War, the home was reported to have been rented out to a wealthy Sultan’s brother. As the story goes the Sultan’s brother had many lavish and loud parties nightly at the house and then one morning, when all was quiet, blood was discovered running down the front steps. The entire harem and the Sultan’s brother (who had been buried alive in the back yard) were murdered. Now whether the partying was too loud and someone was tired of losing sleep, or the brother hung out the window yelling, “My children and my children’s children are going to make gas prices ridiculously expensive for Americans in the future” and somebody took great offense to that, no one knows why they were all killed.

The house is currently divided up into six separate apartment structures and the past residents have reported shadowy figures at the end of their beds watching them in the night. For the price tag of $2,500,000, would you dare to buy the home that was the supposed site of one of the Crescent City’s greatest unsolved murders?

Photo credit: SNAP Real Estate Photography